That Thing You Worry About? It Will Set You Free

I worried about it all week.

My reading at the Spalding MFA residency was scheduled for 4 PM on Friday, as part of the alumni homecoming weekend.  Six alums who had recently published books would read and afterward, sell and sign books.

And I was nervous.

Nervous because I'd spent the week immersed in the glory of talking about writing and literature 24/7.  Every day in workshop, where I assisted the award-winning short-story writer (and my former mentor) Mary Clyde, we went over the finer points of writing literature.  That would be Literature, with a capital L.

One day in class, somebody mentioned Stephen King.

"I don't read popular fiction," Mary Clyde said, not in an unkind way, just an authoritative way.


Because, in my heart of hearts, I consider Emma Jean to be popular fiction.  I wanted my novel to be literary, really I did, but what came out on the page was, well, maybe a bit quirkier than that.   And here I was, in the heart of the world of literature, ready to read the first four pages of the book, in which our heroine declares her hatred of babies and realizes for the first time that her personality is a bit on the snarky side.

Friday afternoon came and as part of my duties as an assistant, I handed out drink tickets for the after-party, which helped soothed my nerves.  (So did the arrival of Leisa Hammett, my student and dear friend, who happened to be in Louisville that weekend. It also helped that my beloved friend Candace was there to check out the MFA program.)  And then it was time to read.

We were in a meeting room on the first floor of the Brown Hotel, where the walls were painted a deep mustard and decorated with curlicued flourishes.  I made my way to the podium and began to read, where I promptly decided as I read that I was bombing, with a capital B, because I couldn't hear much laughter.  (And the novel is, for better or worse, supposed to be funny.)  I told myself that my worst fears had come true.  And I chalked it up to reading a popular fiction piece in a literary environment.

But when it was over, I was greeted with enthusiastic applause and people rushed up to me to tell me how funny I was, and how great the reading had gone.  It turned out that the acoustics in the room were a bit odd and everyone was laughing a lot, I just couldn't hear them.  I sat behind a table which held a placard with my name on it, clutching a glass of wine Candace had brought me, and waited for people to bring me books to sign.

Which, to my surprise, they did.  Like, lots of them did. And it was the most wonderful thing because the comments they made elated me.  How they heard the first paragraph and knew they had to buy the book.  How my bio in the program inspired them.  (Um, that would be the bio that I cringed when I read because it combined my two worlds in a way I thought was a bit un-literary.) How they loved my reading and laughed all the way through it.

And I realized I had done it, done the thing I worry about it more than anything else: been myself.  Because I'd had no other choice, I'd presented myself as the person I am, a writer of popular fiction with a literary background and one who teeters between the poles of these genres a bit uncertainly at times all the time.

I hadn't bombed.  Quite the contrary--I ended up selling more books than any other reader there, which I mention not to brag about, but to prove my point, one that we've heard over and over again, that being authentic is the path to freedom.

Lesson learned.  Phew.  Now I'll probably have to learn it all over again sometime again soon.

PS.  Mary Clyde loved the reading, and she bought my book. 

What about you?  Do you struggle to express your true self?

Interview About Emma Jean

Curves_yellow_reflection_2929_hGood Morning.

How does that cup of coffee you've got clutched in your hand taste?  Wouldn't it be even zestier if you had some scintillating reading material to accompany it?


I have just the thing for you.

I've got an interview up today over at Jessica Nottingham's blog, Hopelessly Devoted Bibliophile, in which I invent a movie tagline for Emma Jean, talk about my favorite part of being an author, name the one book I always reread, and more!

Check it out here, and be sure to say hi in the comments while you are there.  Then stick around to read more of Jessica's posts, she's got all kinds of good stuff on books and authors.

Photo by Adrian Sampson.

Publishing Really Is Worth It

Flower_soft_play_250199_lTo paraphrase the immortal words of Sally Field:  I like it, I really like it.

What is it that I like so much?

Being an author.  Let me explain with a couple of stories.

Story #1. Years ago, I began working with a coach.  I told her that my deepest desire was to publish a novel.  My coach mentioned that she'd worked with another client who had published a book and decided she didn't like it.  Didn't like the hoopla that went with it and decided to not write any more books.  I took this under advisement, willing to be open to the fact that I might not like being published. 

Story #2.  Also years ago (I've been at this game a long time), I read an interview with a best-selling author, whose name now escapes me.  She said something to the effect that she really liked--and missed--the "scrappy little life" she enjoyed before she got published.  Once again, I was willing to be open to the fact that this might happen to me, too.  That I might prefer my life before I was published.


I adore being published.   I love reading reviews of my work, and I love hearing through tweets and emails that readers have enjoyed my book.  Unlike that client my coach told me about, I'm loving this stuff.  I loved my virtual release party and my in-person party.  I loved signing books.  I've got a reading coming up and I anticipate loving that. 

Let's be clear: I still have a "scrappy little life," one that I love.   But publishing a novel has just made it a better scrappy life.  Because, here's the deal: writing is an act of communication and when nobody reads the words we write, part of the loop is missing.  Which is why, I believe, we worry so much about publishing.  Why some writers put the cart before the horse and worry about publishing before they've finished writing.

Because we yearn to communicate.

And let me tell you, it is worth it.  So for those of you in the middle of writing a novel, despairing you may never get to the end: keep going, it's worth it.  For those of you sending out query after query, and piling up the rejections: keep sending them out, it's worth it.  For those of you who've had blips in your publishing process (I've heard of two recently): keep going, it's worth it.

For anyone struggling to get their creative work out in the world: take heart, it will all be worth it.

I promise.

Where are you in the creative process?  Starting out?  Finishing a project?  Marketing?  Leave a comment, I'd love to hear about it.

As The Hoopla Winds Down

I owe you guys a blog post.

I've been guest posting and interviewing all around the internet (thank you, everyone) and, indeed, I have one more interview coming up on Tuesday, one I'm very excited about.  But in the hoopla around my book release I've not spent a lot of time, here, at home base, except for brief posts directing you to other blogs.

I tell myself that a guest post or interview is still me on the page, it's just at another venue.

But still, it feels odd not to be spending as much time here.

And so on this Saturday morning, I will write a bit about where things stand.

My local book release party was Thursday night, the bookend to the virtual release party I hosted a week ago.  We held it on the second floor of one of my favorite local brewpubs and I had a blast.  I think at least 60 people came.  I sold out of all the books I had on hand, and took orders for more. I spilled wine all over everything at the book signing table, including three just-signed books, and several people in attendance got very, very drunk. 

And most of all, I felt like an author.  It's hard not to when you're sitting behind a table signing books.  I think this is a thing that I will grow into more, because I realize  even as I type this that I still have a bit of anxiety around the whole thing.  Stepping out with my novel feels very different than the other writing and writing-related work that I do.  It feels like I'm putting more of me, myself and I out there--which is kinda funny because I strive to do that all the time on this blog.

So maybe it's a matter of getting accustomed to different writing venues.  When I first started writing this blog, come to think of it, I was very shy about sharing it.  I remember telling my family that I'd started a blog and then saying, "But don't go read it yet."  Which is probably hard for you who have read me here regularly to believe.  And I remember even farther back to when I first started getting articles published in magazines how I'd never actually look at them in print.

All of which is odd for a writer, but I don't think I'm the only one who deals with this.   We writers spend so much time alone crafting words that it's a bit of a shock when we realize that others are actually reading them.  But then, that's the point of what we do.  It's just that it sometimes take so long to get our words out there that we get used to nobody reading them.

And getting used to readers reading my novel is a wonderful problem to have.  As far as I can tell by obsessively checking my Amazon sales rank, the novel is doing okay.  Lots of you have said you've purchased it--thank you so much--and as I said, I sold a lot in person.  So I'm happy.

I'm also ready to get back to my so-called normal life, like writing regular blog posts and being on time with critiques and responses to people.  Don't get me wrong, I'm loving everything that has happened, and I'll be talking about my novel in a variety of venues for the forseeable future.  But perhaps we can turn out attention to other things as well. I promise to be here more regularly.

Have you experienced anxiety when getting your words out to the public?  Does it vary with different genres?  I'd love to hear your response.  (And by the way, if you've commented recently and it didn't show up, I'm aware of the problem now, and I think I know how to deal with it, so comment away!)

(You can buy Emma Jean at all the usual outlets, by the way, and I'll be eternally grateful if you do.)

Another Wonderful Interview About Emma Jean

As you may have noticed lately, I've been fortunate to have a variety of guest posts and interviews having to do with the release of my novel, Emma Jean's Bad Behavior.  And today is no different.  Today I am featured over at Zan Marie's blog, In the Shade of the Cherry Tree.

Zan Marie and I met a couple years ago now as the result of a blog hop or a blog carnival or a blog fiesta--the exact event eludes me, but no matter, as we've been fast blogging buddies ever since.  I always love stopping in on her blog and reading about her ongoing writing process and I so appreciate her interview with me, which I very much enjoyed, and I encourage you to head on over there and read it.  I talked quite a bit about the submission process and what it takes to get a novel published.

Thank you, Zan Marie!

A Guest Post on Finding True North

I'm directing you away from my blog today, in order to read a guest post I wrote over at An Angel's Share.  This is the blog of my dear friend, Terry Price.  Terry is a wonderful writer and also a writing teacher and coach.  He and I met through the Writer's Loft at MTSU.  We used to be co-directors of the program and now are both mentors there.

The post is a little bit of a departure from the  Emma Jean-themed posts I've been doing for others in that I talk about how I got clear on what it was I really wanted to do and found my own true north.  I hope you'll check it out.

Come back tomorrow for details on a cool interview that I did!

And don't forget that you can buy Emma Jean here.

10 Ways to Ground Yourself for Writing

Planet_earth_australia_264109_lThis has been an exciting week for me, what with the release of my debut novel, Emma Jean's Bad Behavior.  I've been consciously working on staying open to receive the blessings of this event.  I must admit, though, at times I've felt myself flying high, as if I'm no longer anchored to the earth.

Or the present.

Or my life.

Or my writing.

Excitement and joy are good, yes they are, but when they cause you to spin about in the air above everything that is happening in the real world, something must be done.  And that something is grounding.

You gotta get yourself back to the present moment, back into the energy of your body, back into your fertile brain.  This is especially important for writers, because how you can put words on the page if your brain is spinning out of control into the stratosphere?

Luckily, there are easy fixes for being ungrounded (if that's a word).   I list them here, with the obvious ones first, followed by some not-so-obvious:

1.  Journal.  This is the number one way I find my path back to myself.  For writers, it's a no-brainer.  Open that journal and write. 

2.  Meditate.  Yeah, yeah, I know.  But at least try closing your eyes and taking a few deep breaths.

3.  Prayer.  Also a good route.  Ask the universe for help in getting back into your body.

4.  Walk.  A reliable mind-clearer.

5.  Drink wine.  I don't know why this works, but it does.   A nice glass of red will bring you back down to earth.  This is why I always want a glass of wine after I've flown somewhere.

6.  Cook/eat.  Something about reconnecting with the most elemental of urges--hunger--gets us back on solid ground.

7.  Get outside.  Hug a tree.  Lie on the grass. Make a snowball.  Get outside and enjoy nature.

8.  Go barefoot.  Especially when you're indulging in #7.  The earthers (not to be confused with birthers) believe that connecting with the energy of the earth has major positive health implications.

9.  Take a nap.  Nothing like a quick snooze to reorient your brain.

10.  Soak in water.  Did you know that water used to be considered a health cure?  I worked on a book that had a whole chapter on hydrotherapy and was fascinated.  Water is good for a variety of things (be sure to drink it, too) but a hot bath can soak away other people's energies and bring you right back into yourself.

Do you need to get yourself grounded at times?  What's your favorite way to do it?

***My novel is now for sale!  Click here to find links to all the major online outlets.  And thank you everyone for your support!

Photo by monique72.

It's Emma Jean's Release Day!

Watch out, world, Emma Jean is here!

Today is the official release day of my debut novel, Emma Jean's Bad Behavior.  I promise we'll get back to regular programming (i.e., posts on writing and creativity and the writer's life) but for now indulge me while I celebrate.

In truth, the novel has been available at AmazonPowell's and Barnes and Noble for awhile now and I know some people have already ordered it and received it (thank you!).  But February 12th has been the official pub date for quite some time now, so it seems appropriate to mark it.

In case you haven't heard, I'm hosting a Virtual Release party later on today, with three signed copies of the novel and one admittance to my Get Your Novel Written Now class as prizes. Join me!

So far I've had an interview (it ended up actually being with Emma Jean) at Square-Peg People and a guest post at Always Well Within. I've got another guest post and two more interviews lined up for next week and I'll share the links on the appropriate days. 

I'll tell you the one thing I've learned through this release and that is how wonderful, gracious, and supportive people are--especially the people I've met through this blog.  You guys are wonderful!  This novel release is the fruition of a life-long dream and while it's been a bit nerve-wracking along the way, I remind myself how lucky I am every day.

So thank you to everyone for your support and if you do read the book and like it, please tell your friends.  Also, feel free to write review on any of the bookseller's sites!

Countdown to Release and Life Lessons from Emma Jean

First of all, I've got a guest post over at Always Well Within today.  If you don't know Sandra's blog, you should.  She writes about spiritual and personal development matters in a way that always makes me feel calm and peaceful.  Just going to her space centers me. 

The topic of my guest post there is 10 Life Lessons From Emma Jean.  Sandra suggested the title and I immediately loved it.  And then I stressed a lot a bit over the writing of it, because I loved the topic so much and I wanted it to be right.  It ended up being a lot of fun to write, once I got over my angst, and I'm happy with the result.  I'd love it if you checked it out.

And, tomorrow is the big day.  It is the official release day of Emma Jean's Bad Behavior (although the book is already available everywhere, except in the Kindle version which I can't quite figure out).  I'm celebrating with a Virtual Release party, which you can still sign up for, and I'll be back tomorrow with a post about the release process.

Please go read Sandra's blog!


Interview with Emma Jean (Yup, Emma Jean)

I've got a series of interviews and guest posts scheduled for the next couple weeks, all of them celebrating the release of my new novel, Emma Jean's Bad Behavior.

The first of these is today!  And I couldn't be happier that it is with my dear friend Karen Caterson, who blogs at Square-Peg People.  Check it out I think you'll enjoy it.  Karen has a whole series of wonderful interviews with Square-Peg types and I got to one of them....except that bossy ole Emma Jean herself came in and took over the interview.

Let me know what you think!

And don't forget to sign up for the Emma Jean Virtual Release Party.  There will be prizes.

Oh, Amazon, You Trickster, You

Book-books-collection-415-lIf you enter the title of my novel, Emma Jean's Bad Behavior, into the Amazon search engine, up my book will pop, despite the fact that its pub date is not until February 12th.  And no, there's nothing about pre-ordering it mentioned on the page.  It's just there.  For sale.

I found this out thanks to the alert eyes of my reader and online buddy Zan Marie.  Now, I'd be happy to have my book available for sale, except for a couple of things:

--This isn't the final copy.  I worked on final proofing all the way to Nashville and back.  Caught a few small errors.  No big deal, you say?  Uh-uh.  Not for me.  I'm a printer's daughter and pride myself on being able to catch typos.  (Now, of course, you'll find one or more.  That's alright.  I can take it.  Let me know, I won't be hurt.) I also tinkered with the acknowledgments (the hardest part of writing the book, I swear) a bit.  And I wanted my readers to get this corrected copy, the final, final copy.  The perfect one.

--We set the pub date for February 12th and I wanted to have the requisite hoopla around it on that date.  Not some vague earlier time.  I wanted it to be a specific date, an event.  (I'm working on ideas for how I can share this event with you, so stay tuned.)  Silly, maybe, but so be it.

So I emailed my ever-patient editor and she promptly contacted Amazon to have them take it down, at the very least until the final final copy gets to them.  (You'll still see it listed for sale if you search for it or click here.  I actually don't know what happens if you click on it to buy it.)

But here's what cracks me up: Just as Emma Jean does in the novel, I started checking my Amazon sales rank.  At one point, it was down to #717,876 or something like that.  Wow!  I was feeling pretty good about that.  I mean, it wasn't even officially on sale yet and already I was ranked below a million.  Uh-huh, uh-huh, uh-huh. 

And then my editor emailed me back yet again and said that as far as the publishers could tell only one copy of that version of the book had been sold. (Thanks, Jenni--you've got a one-of-a-kind edition.)  So, as my daughter-in-law said, thus selling one book=#717,876 rank.  Does this mean if I sell two I get put right up to #1?   Um, probably not.  Apparently the Amazon algorithm is mysterious and unknown, just like the Google's.

Thus, note to self: do NOT fuss and obsess over the Amazon sales ranking when the book comes out.  Because it doesn't mean anything.  Does it?

Do you have experience with Amazon?  I'd love to hear it.  Barring that, what do you obsess over?  That's an even better topic.  Please share in the comments.

**There's only a couple more days of early-bird pricing for my Get Your Novel Written Now class.  Check out more info here.


Emma Jean Cover Image is Here!

EmmaJeanCoverFinalHere it is!  The cover image for the novel, due out on February 12th.  I'm really happy with this cover because I think the woman in the image has the verve and energy of Emma Jean herself.

A bit of background on the process of selecting the cover.  My wonderful editor sent me three trial versions and asked me what I thought.  One of them looked like a car ad to me, with the model featuring a come-hither expression that looked to me like she was trying to be sexy.  She was draped over a bed with a laptop in front of her.  Good effort, but no.

The second one showed a close-up of a blonde woman with glasses reading a book.  I was tempted by this version, mostly because of the fact she was reading, but I didn't think the model looked much like Emma Jean.  She seemed a bit dowdy to me.  As my editor said, "I think Emma Jean is more put together than that."

The third version was similar to what you see on the right, but it showed only the model with slightly different typestyle.  I asked if we could add something literary-esque and my editor suggested the books.  The first version had the stack of books a bit taller and looked like they were about ready to topple over on top of her.  But then this version was presented to me--and I loved it.  They even used my favorite color, purple!  (In the novel, Emma Jean has a thing for purple pens.)

I feel blessed to have been so involved in the cover image.  I have no idea if this is normal or not but it's great!

So I'm counting down the days until release date, mastering Facebook, lining up guest posts and reviews and feeling a bit nervous about it all to be honest.  (By the way, if you're interested in a guest post or review or know anybody who might be, drop me a line.)

Any thoughts on the process?  Any questions?  Leave me a comment.

On Reading My Own Work: The Issue of Sentimentality

Book-books-collection-415-lTwo stories:

Story number one

I'm sitting at my computer, laughing.  My husband asks me what I'm chuckling about.

"Oh, I'm proofing my novel.  I'm not sure if this is good or bad, but Emma Jean makes me laugh, even though I wrote her."

I've gone through edits, and copy edits, and now one round of proofing, and every time it makes me laugh.  Every time, reading the novel makes me remember how much I loved writing it.  How much I love my heroine, Emma Jean.  How happy I am that the book is being published.

Story number two

This year for Christmas presents, I printed out copies of my MFA novel, Language of Trees, for my daughter and daughter-in-law, because they hounded me for it at their request.  As the chapters came off the printer, I read bits and pieces of it.  Some of it I liked, but some of it made me cringe.  And now when I picture the girls reading it, I cringe anew.

So what's the difference in these two stories?

Well for one thing, Emma Jean has been rewritten, revised and edited within an inch of her life.  Though I worked and worked at writing Language of Trees, I could never quite get it to hang together.  (I'm hoping to change that this year, and I'm giving serious thought to going the indie publishing route with it.)

But here's what I believe the major cringe-worthy factor is: sentimentality.

The best definition of sentimentality I've ever read is that it is unearned emotion.

Language of Trees still has a lot of moments of unearned emotion that have not been edited out.  The kind of thing that makes you wince when you read it.  Oh God, I just remembered a party scene from the novel wherein all the men in attendance fall head-over-heels in admiration of Collie, our heroine.  Ouch. This is embarrassing to me in retrospect because it is a sentimental moment.  Collie has done nothing to earn their ardor but appear at the party.  Unearned emotion.

And, if I'm honest, when I ponder the novel I'm currently at work on, there's lots of instances of sentimentality.  In my defense, it's still a first draft.  The one with holes big enough to drive a truck through.  (I can't remember who told me that metaphor, but whoever you are, thank you.  I love it.)  And some of those holes are unearned emotion.

So I have to admit that printing out Language of Trees was a good exercise for me, pointing out, for future reference, something I want to keep a closer eye out for.  And it gives me a road map for rewriting it.  I can start with the places that make me cringe and go from there.

How does sentimentality tend to present itself in your work?  Is it an issue for you or not?

**If you're struggling with issues of sentimentality or other writing craft problems, make 2013 your year to go full out with your writing.  Consider gifting yourself a writing coach.  There's no better way to make fast progress with your writing!

Photo by lusi.

Emma Jean Update & Pub Date

Black_glasses_publish_263961_lSo, auditorally is not a word.

Who knew?

But this, my dear writing friends, is why God created copy editors: to tell us such things.

I recently finished going through the copy edits for my forthcoming novel, Emma Jean's Bad Behavior, and my wonderful copy editor researched the word auditorally in three dictionaries before deciding that it really isn't a word.    I think I may have made up a couple other words along the way; I know for certain I made up usages of a word here or there.

Going through the editing process of this book has made me hugely grateful for the art of editing.  It's been a wonderful experience all the way through, and I know for certain that the editing has made it a much stronger book.


I have a publishing date!

Drum roll please.....

It's February 12th.

By my reckoning, that is the second Tuesday in February, just in time to buy as a gift for Valentine's Day.

I'm very excited.

And oh so grateful.

**Are you eager to become a published author but not quite sure how to get there from where you are?  Perhaps some gentle assistance is what you need.  My students and clients have published award-winning books, finished novels and book proposals and submitted stories and article galore.  I love watching writers thrive like this!  Check out my services page if you'd like to join their ranks.

Photo by ugaldew.

Writing Tics, or What I'm Learning From the Emma Jean Edits

Lens_magnifying_glass_266925_lI'm deep into the edits for my novel, Emma Jean's Bad Behavior, and some things are becoming apparent.  As in, writing tic type things.  As in, the little silly stuff I do over and over again.  I thought sharing these tics might be helpful to you.  I know I'll be much more conscious of them as I write my next novel.

So here goes:

--I use the word and too much, often a lot of times in the same sentence. 

--I misuse commas.  Don't ask me how, because I don't quite get it, but I think I use too many of them.

--I over do it with the dialogue tags.  My editor, Nannette, is forever knocking them out.  And I would have told you I used them sparingly.

--I am guilty of repeating words.  I am a demon when it comes to this on my student's work, always exhorting them to change repeated words.  And I would have told you that my manuscript was clean, so clean when it came to such things.  But, no.  Nannette finds plenty of instances of this habit.

--I need to write around lyrics.  Emma Jean always has a song for every occasion, and will happily share it with you.  But this does not work because one must get permission to use song lyrics.  And such permission costs one money.  So I'm writing around them.

So far, the issue with the song lyrics has been the biggest thing I've had to deal with in the edits.  I know there's a problem in one of the final scenes that I've got to deal with and I'm dreading that.  But that's still pages away.  At the moment, I'm on page 200 of 374 and enjoying the process.  The great thing about going through the edits is that it's teaching me about my own writing, and hopefully strengthening it.

Tell me: what are you writing tics?  Have you ever had an editor point them out to you?



Emma Jean Edits

The day came.  My edits for the novel arrived.  And I promptly left for a two-day vacation. Arch-cape-or

We went to the beach to stay with old friends, our daughter and the Most Adorable Baby in the World in tow.  I had visions of myself on the deck, feet propped up, laptop in lap, working away on the edits.  Or sitting in a corner of the beach house, happily revisiting my old friend, the novel.


Because it was way too sunny on the deck for me to see the laptop screen.  And every corner of the beach house was filled--gloriously so--with people. Most importantly, I wanted to be present in the vacation world and hang with my living friends, not hobnob with my fictional pals.  And so I sat at the kitchen table and answered a few emails and replied to some blog comments (thank you, I love your comments). And then I called it a day and went for a walk on the beach.

Turns out I'm not really slacking.  Before I left I emailed my editor, asking her for a deadline, thinking she'd probably mention a date in mid-August.  But, no, she said I could get it in right after Labor Day.  So I've got plenty of time. 

I'm eager to get to this.  As already noted, it's not a huge job, at least it doesn't look like it from a quick scan of the file.  I'm always a little wonky in the Track Changes feature on Word until I get into it, so there's that.  And I did see one comment about an important character reappearing at the end that my editor thinks is unnecessary.  That will require some thought in how to fix.  I'm sure there's more stuff like that throughout.

But I can't wait to get started on it--opening the file was like visiting old friends.  Which, come to think of it was the theme of the week, both in my real world and my fictional world.  How about that?

What about you?  How do you feel about the editing process?  Do you have experience working with an editor?  I'd love to hear!

**If you want to write a novel of your very own, I've got a novel-writing class beginning August 14th.  We'll cover the basics of the process and all the things you need to know to have at it.  Read more here and join us!

(I found the photo on the interwebs, and I think it comes from Tripadvisor.)